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The 'Scenes' Index

The 'scenes' index is just that; a collection of scenes from around Banburyshire. The index links to HD-size images of each scene, allowing you to enjoy it in far greater detail than is provided in the ordinary walks posts. Alongside each scene is a date and a map link – allowing you to find the location and enjoy the scene for real.

Note that there's also a map-based scenes index page allowing you to see more easily where the images were taken.

Scenes index: 1-10 11-20 21-30 31-40

19th April 2013

For a dull plant, the flower spikes of butterbur are beautiful. From when the large floppy leaves die back in the late Summer I can't wait for the flower spikes emerge in Spring. They're weird, like something out of an alien movie. For the best view, you have to get down on your belly and see the world from their level.

Link to on-line map


19th April 2013

For a few weeks I'd been wrestling with a problem. It seemed, ordinarily, insurmountable. I took the first bus on a frosty December morning and took at walk out of Swacliffe. Nearing the top of the ridge a solution appeared; and in that moment my life forked from the ordinary path before me – this was that moment. Though I didn't relish the possibility, I might have to personally try and 'arrest' the Cabinet!.

Link to on-line map


19th April 2018

On the first hot day of the year, I haul myself to the top of the hill and dump down to cool off in the breeze. It's a great view across the Irondowns from here – from Sibford Heath to the west, past Shenlow Hill to and Edgehill due north, and extending to Berry Hill, Redhill and the transmitter tower near Charwelton about 12 miles north-east. Behind, the geologically fractured Tadmarton/Swalcliffe valley marks the transition into Cotswold Limestone.

Link to on-line map


1st May 2018

Some people struggle to find this place – probably because it's right in front of them, but looks nothing like what they expect to find. To locate it: find the crossroads where the B4022 meets the small road out of Enstone village heading towards Fulwell; then 5 metres from the crossroads on the Fulwell side, it's on your right in the trees. It's enclosed by trees, well shaded, and so the stones are covered in mosses and ferns. In the low-angle light from the clouded sky, everything is bathed in shades of green. As well as the large standing stones, there are equally large stones laid flat on the ground.

Link to on-line map


1st May 2018

From Chadlington Downs, after a mile or so I fork right off the road to my favourite location of the day – taking in the excellent panorama along the Evenlode Valley and across Wychwood. The hillside slowly falls away into the Evenlode Valley, descending through arable fields towards the hamlet of Dean. About half-way, sticking out a few fields ahead, you can see a single standing stone – The Hawk Stone. This tantalising glimpse still means that you're a few fields, and few minutes away.

Link to on-line map


1st May 2018

From Sarsden crossroads the surfaced road turns into a farm track, and then into a bridlepath through Sarsgrove Woods. The bluebells are not quite out yet – but they'll be great in a week or two. The woods are also eeriely quite, with very little birdsong other than a few alarm calls from robins and blackbirds.

Link to on-line map


1st May 2018

The Hawk Stone is probably the single remainder of a group of stones that were part of a chamber tomb. As monoliths go, much like the symbolic block in the film 2001, this really does have the look of the 'real thing' – a symbolic if enigmatic communication from elsewhere in time. Like the Rollright Stones it's pitted and weathered, with a patina of lichen and staining suggesting a long time spent outdoors in this spot. Corbett's local history of Spelsbury says that local witches were once tied to the stone and burned.

Link to on-line map


previous page, nos. 21 to 30