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Tracking the ecological overshoot of the human economy

PNAS, vol.99 no.14 pp.9266-9271, 09/07/2002


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Resource information:
Resource IDwackernagel2002
Resource titleTracking the ecological overshoot of the human economy
Author(s)Mathis Wackernagel, Niels B. Schulz, Diana Deumling, Alejandro Callejas Linares, Martin Jenkins, Valerie Kapos, Chad Monfreda, Jonathan Loh, Norman Myers, Richard Norgaard, Jørgen Randers
Publication/ sourcePNAS, vol.99 no.14 pp.9266-9271
Date published09/07/2002
Summary text/ abstractSustainability requires living within the regenerative capacity of the biosphere. In an attempt to measure the extent to which humanity satisfies this requirement, we use existing data to translate human demand on the environment into the area required for the production of food and other goods, together with the absorption of wastes. Our accounts indicate that human demand may well have exceeded the biosphere's regenerative capacity since the 1980s. According to this preliminary and exploratory assessment, humanity's load corresponded to 70% of the capacity of the global biosphere in 1961, and grew to 120% in 1999.
Library categoriesEconomics, 'Limits to Growth', Simplicity
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