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Past connections and present similarities in slave ownership and fossil fuel usage

Climatic Change, vol.105 no.1/2 pp.329-355, March 2011


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Resource information:
Resource IDmouhot2011
Resource titlePast connections and present similarities in slave ownership and fossil fuel usage
Author(s)Jean-François Mouhot
Publication/ sourceClimatic Change, vol.105 no.1/2 pp.329-355
Date publishedMarch 2011
Summary text/ abstractThe first part of the paper demonstrates the connection between the abolition of slavery and the Industrial Revolution: steam power changed the perception of labour; new techniques facilitated diffusion of pro-abolition pamphlets; fewer threats to basic existence resulting from industrial advances fostered sensibilities and moral standards toward abolitionism; and, through industrial development, the North grasped victory in the American Civil War. The second part presents similarities between societies in the past that have used slave labour and those in the present that use fossil fuels. It argues that slaves and fossil-fuelled machines play(ed) similar economic and social roles: both slave societies and developed countries externalise(d) labour and both slaves and modern machines free(d) their owners from daily chores. Consequently, we are as dependent on fossil fuels as slave societies were dependent on bonded labour. It also suggests that, in differing ways, suffering resulting (directly) from slavery and (indirectly) from the excessive burning of fossil fuels are now morally comparable. When we emit carbon dioxide at a rate that exceeds what the ecosystem can absorb, when we deplete non-renewable resources, we indirectly cause suffering to other human beings. Similarly, cheap oil facilitates imports of goods from countries with little social protection and hence help externalise oppression. The conclusion draws on the lessons which may be learned by Climate Change campaigners from the campaigns to abolish slavery: environmental apathy can be opposed effectively if we learn from what worked in the fight against this inhuman institution.
Library categoriesAnarchism & Action, Climate Change, Energy, 'Limits to Growth', Neo-Luddism, Peak Oil
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