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Natural Gas: Guardrails For A Potential Climate Bridge

Stockholm Environment Institute, May 2015


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Resource information:
Resource IDlazarus2015
Resource titleNatural Gas: Guardrails For A Potential Climate Bridge
Author(s)Michael Lazarus, Kevin Tempest, Per Klevnäs, and Jan Ivar Korsbakken
Publication/ sourceStockholm Environment Institute
Date publishedMay 2015
Summary text/ abstractRecent experience in the United States suggests that increasing natural gas supply has the potential to deliver multiple wins: lower energy costs, improved energy security, reduced air pollution, and a significantly less carbon-intensive electricity supply. Over the past decade, the U.S. shale gas revolution has dramatically increased supplies of low-cost natural gas, upended U.S. coal markets, and led many electric utilities to switch from coal to natural gas. Despite continuing concerns about local impacts of hydraulic fracturing ("fracking") practices, natural gas is expected to remain abundant and relatively inexpensive in the U.S.
Library categoriesClimate Change, Extr. Energy Climate
Added to Free Range Library31/10/2016
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file iconNatural Gas: Guardrails For A Potential Climate Bridge [2.7 megabytes]
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