FRAW site index
Free Range Library index

Free Range Library
categories:

Anarchism & Action

Climate Change

Croughtonwatch

Cyberwar

Direct Action & Protest

Economics

Energy

Electrosmog

Extreme Energy

Extr. Energy Climate

Extr. Energy Economics

Extr. Energy Nature

Extr. Energy Pollution

Extr. Energy Radiation

Food & Agriculture

FOSS & Linux

Hacktivism

Land Rights

'Limits to Growth'

Neo-Luddism

Nuclear

Peace

Peak Oil

Planning System

Politics

Simplicity

Technology

Toxics

Transport

UCG

UK Government

UK Parliament

Vegans/Vegetarians

Waste

50 most recently added files index

Free Range Library indexes last updated 15:41, 28/06/2018

This form allows you to search the resource IDs and resource titles of the files in the Free Range Library. If a full match to a key cannot be found, a list of partial matches is returned.

library logo

The Free Range Virtual Library:

CO2, Methane, and Brine Leakage through Subsurface Pathways: Exploring Modeling, Measurement, and Policy Options

Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Princeton University, June 2014


Free Range Library News & Events

10/04/18: Library database engine updated.

28/08/17: Library database engine updated (FRAW Library should be listed on searches more easily now).

10/08/17: Further changes to the website architecture completed to allowed continued expansion of the library.

22/12/16: 14 papers have been added to the Extreme Energy, Climate Change and UK Government sections.

22/11/16: 60 papers have been added to the Extreme Energy section.

back to previous page

Resource information:
Resource IDkang20141
Resource titleCO2, Methane, and Brine Leakage through Subsurface Pathways: Exploring Modeling, Measurement, and Policy Options
Author(s)Mary Kang
Publication/ sourceDepartment of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Princeton University
Date publishedJune 2014
Summary text/ abstractSubsurface pathways, such as abandoned oil and gas wells and faults, can serve as leakage pathways for CO2 , methane, brine, and other fluids. These pathways allow fluids from deep subsurface formations to migrate into shallow groundwater aquifers or to the atmosphere. To estimate leakage rates and the associated pressure effects on adjacent aquifers, analytical models representing fluid flow in the vicinity of leaky faults are developed in Chapter 2. The incorporation of this kind of fault model in larger basin-wide multi-scale models allows sub-grid-scale effects due to leakage through faults to be captured with improved efficiency. Three of the 19 measured wells are high emitters. Because these high emitters govern the average flux, more field iiimeasurements are needed. Such measurement plans should be aimed at identifying attributes that aid in finding these high emitters. Leakage was found to occur at both plugged and unplugged wells. As such, existing well abandonment regulations in Pennsylvania do not appear to be effective in controlling methane emissions from AOG wells. As a mitigation strategy, inclusion of gases emitted from AOG wells in Pennsylvania's Alternative Energy Portfolio Standard may be valuable for both promoting capture and possible use of the gas as well as for reporting and monitoring of these wells.
Library categoriesClimate Change, Extr. Energy Climate
Added to Free Range Library22/06/2014
Download file(s):

file iconCO2, Methane, and Brine Leakage through Subsurface Pathways: Exploring Modeling, Measurement, and Policy Options [2.6 megabytes]
This file is not located within the Free Range Activism Website


back to previous page

[an error occurred while processing this directive]