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Differences in negativity bias underlie variations in political ideology

Journal of Behavioral and Brain Sciences, vol.37 no.3 pp.297-307, June 2014


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Resource information:
Resource IDhibbing2014
Resource titleDifferences in negativity bias underlie variations in political ideology
Author(s)John R. Hibbing, Kevin B. Smith, John R. Alford
Publication/ sourceJournal of Behavioral and Brain Sciences, vol.37 no.3 pp.297-307
Date publishedJune 2014
Summary text/ abstractDA rapidly growing body of empirical evidence documents a multitude of ways in which liberals and conservatives differ from each other in purviews of life with little direct connection to politics, from tastes in art to desire for closure and from disgust sensitivity to the tendency to pursue new information, but the central theme of the differences is a matter of debate. In this article, we argue that one organizing element of the many differences between liberals and conservatives is the nature of their physiological and psychological responses to features of the environment that are negative. Compared with liberals, conservatives tend to register greater physiological responses to such stimuli and also to devote more psychological resources to them. Operating from this point of departure, we suggest approaches for refining understanding of the broad relationship between political views and response to the negative. We conclude with a discussion of normative implications, stressing that identifying differences across ideological groups is not tantamount to declaring one ideology superior to another.
Library categoriesAnarchism & Action, Politics
Added to Free Range Library14/10/2014
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file iconDifferences in negativity bias underlie variations in political ideology [996.9 kilobytes]


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