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Our hypocrisy: By granting that animals have minds similar to ours, it looks as if we are evolving in our moral relationship with other species.

New Scientist, no.2502 p.51-52, 04/06/2005


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Resource information:
Resource IDfrancione20051
Resource titleOur hypocrisy: By granting that animals have minds similar to ours, it looks as if we are evolving in our moral relationship with other species.
Author(s)Gary Francione
Publication/ sourceNew Scientist, no.2502 p.51-52
Date published04/06/2005
Summary text/ abstractDo great apes, dolphins, parrots, and perhaps even "food" animals have certain cognitive characteristics that entitle them to be accorded greater moral consideration and legal protection? A considerable literature has so argued in recent times. The central idea behind this enterprise is the notion that we must rethink our relationship with non-humans if we find they are intelligent, self-aware, or have emotions. To the extent that non-humans have minds like ours, runs the argument, they have similar interests, and they are entitled to greater protection because of those interests. This "similar-minds" approach has spawned an industry of cognitive ethologists eager to investigate – ironically often through various sorts of animal experiments – the extent to which they are like us.
Library categoriesAnarchism & Action, Food & Agriculture
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file iconOur hypocrisy: By granting that animals have minds similar to ours, it looks as if we are evolving in our moral relationship with other species. [77.1 kilobytes]
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